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Subject: Re: WAC Corrections

Author: Dann Corbit

Date: 10:24:02 04/12/01

Go up one level in this thread


On April 12, 2001 at 10:45:23, Alex Szabo wrote:

>What is the accepted list of corrections to the "Win at Chess" problems?
>
>Here's my list; can anyone suggest additional corrections (or corrections
>to my corrections)?
>
>------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>     Corrections and Notes to Fred Reinfeld's 300 "Win at Chess" Problems
>
>        Compiled by Alex Szabo (alex@accesswest.com) on 12 April 2001
>
>------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>                            C O R R E C T I O N S
>
>	Problem		Solution Change		Comment
>	=======		===============		=======
>
>	#22		Bc4-a2			additional solution
Agree.

>
>	#31		d5xe6			additional solution
>			g2-g3			additional solution
Agree.
>
>	#33		Qe4-f4			additional solution
Agree.
>
>	#38		Qc3-d3			additional solution
Agree.
>
>	#41		b6-b7			DELETE book solution
>			Kb5-c5			DELETE book solution
>			Kb5-c6			DELETE book solution
>			Kb5-a5			correct solution
I have:
1k6/5RP1/1P6/1K6/6r1/8/8/8 w - - bm Ka5 Kc5 b7; id "WAC.041";

>	#69		h2-h3			additional solution
Agree.
>
>	#92		Nf6xg4			DELETE book solution
>			Be6xg4			correct solution
Agree.
>
>	#98		Nc5-b3			DELETE (2nd) book solution
I have:
1r3rk1/5pb1/p2p2p1/Q1n1q2p/1NP1P3/3p1P1B/PP1R3P/1K2R3 b - - bm Nxe4; id
"WAC.098";

>
>	#100		Bd2-e3			additional solution
Agree.
>
>	#105		Bd6xg3			additional solution
I have:
r2r2k1/pb3ppp/1p1bp3/7q/3n2nP/PP1B2P1/1B1N1P2/RQ2NRK1 b - - bm Qxh4; id
"WAC.105";

Your solution will require careful testing and analysis by a chess expert.

>
>	#120		Rh1-g1			additional solution
Agree.

>	#123		Re7-c7			additional solution
>			Re7-e6			additional solution
I have:
6k1/1b2rp2/1p4p1/3P4/PQ4P1/2N2q2/5P2/3R2K1 b - - bm Bxd5 Rc7; id "WAC.123";
Re6 will require additional testing and verification by a chess expert.

>
>	#140		Be5-c7			additional solution
I have:
r2b1rk1/pq4p1/4ppQP/3pB1p1/3P4/2R5/PP3PP1/5RK1 w - - bm Rc7; id "WAC.140";
Bc7 will require additional testing anf verification.

>
>	#142		f5-f6+			additional solution
Agree.
>
>	#150		Bd6-a3			additional solution
>			e4-e3			additional solution
Agree.

>	#152		Nc3-d5			DELETE book solution
>			Nc3-e4			correct solution
Agree.

>	#157		h3xg4			DELETE book solution
>			Nd5-e7+			correct solution
Agree.

>	#199		Rc1-d1			additional solution
Agree.

>	#210		Be2-b5			DELETE book solution
>			Rd1-h1			correct solution
Agree.

>	#216		Nf3-g5			additional solution
>			a2-a4			additional solution
I have:
r2qr1k1/1b1nbppp/p3pn2/1p1pN3/3P1B2/2PB1N2/PP2QPPP/R4RK1 w - - bm Nxf7; id
"WAC.216";
Your solutions will require additional testing and verification by a chess
expert.

>	#224		e5-e4			additional solution
Agree.

>	#229		Rh5xh4			additional solution
Agree.

>	#230		Rb7-a7			additional solution
>			Rb7-b5			additional solution
>			Rb7-b6			additional solution
>			Rb7-d7			additional solution
>			Rb7-f7			additional solution
>			Rb7-g7			additional solution
>			Rb7-h7			additional solution
>			Kc6-b5			additional solution
>			Kc6-b6			additional solution
>			Kc6-d7			additional solution
>			Bc8-d7			additional solution
>			a5-a4			additional solution
>			Rb7-c7			additional solution
No way.
Rb4 is the only winning move, and it is a winning move.  All the others are
foolish time wasters.

>	#232		Qa6-b5			additional solution
Agree.

>	#249		d4-d5			additional solution
Agree.

>	#264		Rd8xd4			DELETE book solution
>			Ra8-b8			correct solution
Agree.

>	#273		g4-g3			additional solution
Agree.

>	#275		b7-b5			additional solution
>			Nd7-c5			additional solution
I have:
r1b2rk1/1p1n1ppp/p1p2q2/4p3/P1B1Pn2/1QN2N2/1P3PPP/3R1RK1 b - - bm Nxg2 b5; id
"WAC.275";
Your solution Nc5 will require additional testing and verification by a chess
expert.

>	#277		Rg8xg2			additional solution
Agree.

>	#278		(none)			add black knight on c6
Here is what I have:
[D]r2qkb1r/pppb2pp/2np1n2/5pN1/2BQP3/2N5/PPP2PPP/R1B1K2R w KQkq - bm Bf7+; id
"WAC.278";

>	#279		Rb3-c3			additional solution
I have:
r7/4b3/2p1r1k1/1p1pPp1q/1P1P1P1p/PR2NRpP/2Q3K1/8 w - - bm Nxf5; id "WAC.279";
Your solution Rc3 will require additional testing and verification by a chess
expert.

>	#294		Bd6-f8			additional solution
>			Qg4-f4			additional solution
Agree.

>
>	#296		Rd8-d4			DELETE book solution
>			Bc6-d7			correct solution

I have:
3r4/1p2k2p/p1b1p1p1/4Q1Pn/2B3KP/4pP2/PP2R1N1/6q1 b - - bm Rd4+ Rf8; id
"WAC.296";
This one is pretty topsy-turvy compared with your notes.  Hence it will need
analysis and verification.

>	#297		Bc6xg2			additional solution
Agree.

Most of your corrections are well known.

>------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>                                  N O T E S
>                                =============
>
>#22	Ba2 also wins a pawn.
>
>	[Nxe6, Qe2, Qh5, Bb5+, and Bf1 also recover the pawn; however, the
>	book solution Nxf7 (and Ba2 to a lesser extent) are positionally
>	better.]
>
>
>#30	[Qc3+ is not as good as the book solution Nxd6.]
>
>
>#31	dxe6 also wins.  For example,  1. dxe6 fxe6  2. Ng5 Bxh2+
>	3. Kxh2 Qf4+  4. Kg1 Rf8  5. Nf3  and white is a piece ahead.
>
>	g3 also wins.  For example,  1. g3 Bd6 (1... Bxg3 is better)
>	2. dxe6 Rd8  3. Ng5  and white is winning.
>
>
>#33	Qf4 also wins.
>
>
>#38	Qd3 also wins the queen for the rook.
>
>
>#41	The book solutions b7, Kc5, and Kc6 are NOT the most economical;
>	Ka5 is the most economical method.
>
>
>#52	[c4 is not as good as the book solution Re7.]
>
>
>#60	[Qh7+ also mates, but not as economically as Qh8+.]
>
>
>#69	h3 also wins.  For example,  1. h3 Qd1+ (1... Qh4 2. Re8+ Rd8?
>	3. Qe6+ Kb8 4. Qd7! and white mates)  2. Kh2 Rd6 (if 2... Rd8
>	3. Re7 wins, if 2... b6 3. Qe4 wins, if 2... c6 3. Re8+ Rd8
>	4. Rd7 Re7 5. Qd6 wins)  3. Qh8+ Rd8  4. Re8  and white wins.
>
>
>#90	[Nxh6+ is not as good as the book solution Nxg7.]
>
>
>#92	The book solution Nxg4 does NOT win a pawn.  The refutation is
>	1... Nxg4?  2. Bxg7 Qh5  3. Bxg4 Bxg4  4. Qd4!
>
>	Bxg4 does win a pawn.  For example,  1... Bxg4  2. Bxg4 Nxg4
>	3. Bxg7 Qh5  and black will regain his piece a pawn ahead.
>
>
>#98	Both book solutions (Nxe4 and Nb3) win; however, Nxe4 is the most
>	economical.
>
>
>#100	Be3 also wins.  For example,  1. Be3 Bd6 (1... Kb6? 2. Bxf5!)
>	2. Ka5 Bc7+  3. b6+ Bxb6+  4. Kb5 Bc7  5. Bxc5+ Ka8  6. Be3
>	and white wins;  or  1. Be3 Bb6  2. Bf2 Ka8  3. Be1 Bc7
>	(3... Kb8  4. Ba5 Ka7  5. Bxb6+ Kxb6  6. Ka3 Ka7  7. Kb3 Kb6
>	8. Ka4 Ka7  9. Ka5 and white wins)  4. Ba5 Bxf4  5. b6 Be3  6. Kb5
>	and black is soon mated.
>
>
>#104	[Qe4 and Qg4 also mate, but not as economically as Qxh5.]
>
>
>#105	Bxg3 also wins, if not as cleanly.
>
>
>#120	Rhg1 also wins.  For example,  1. Rhg1 Qg6  2. Nh4 Rxf6
>	3. Nxg6 Rxg6  4. Qh4  and white has won the queen for two pieces.
>
>
>#123	Rc7 also wins.
>
>	Re6 wins most economically.  For example,  1... Re6  2. Qb5 g5
>	3. Qd3 Re1+  4. Rxe1 Qxd3  and white's game is collapsing.
>
>
>#130	[After  1... Qh6  2. Bxe3 Qxh3  3. Re2 Rh6!  black wins easily;
>	however, after  2. Rxe3! fxe3  3. Qxe3 Qxe3  4. Bxe3 Rf3  5. Bg5 Rxh3
>	6. Kf2  the win is not straightforward.]
>
>	[Qh8 does not work, as should be clear from the above line.]
>
>
>#136	[Qf6 and Nxg7 also mate, but not as economically as Rc8+.]
>
>
>#140	Bc7 also wins.  For example,  1. Bc7 Rf7  2. h7+ Kh8  3. Qxf7 Be7
>	4. Qxe7  and white is ahead a rook and a bishop with an easy win.
>
>
>#142	f6+ also wins.  For example,  1. f6+ Qxf6  2. Rh7+ Kxh7  3. Qxf6
>	does the job.
>
>
>#146	[Bd3 and Bh3 also win, but not as economically as Bc8.]
>
>
>#149	[1... Bxg2  2. Re3 Rxe3  3. Qxe3 f4!  wins decisively.]
>
>
>#150	[1... Bf8  2. Bc4 Bxh6  3. Qxg6+ Qg7  4. Bxf7+ Kh8  5. Rc7 Qxg6
>	6. Bxg6 Re5  7. Rh7+ Kg8  8. Rxh6 Kg7  9. Bxe4 Rxe4  and black wins.]
>
>	Ba3 also wins.  For example,  1... Ba3  2. Rc6 Kh7  3. Qe3 Qxa2
>	and black wins.
>
>	e3 wins most economically.  For example,  1... e3  2. Bxe3 Qxe2
>	3. Qxd6 Rxe3  and black wins easily.
>
>
>#152	Ne4 is stronger than the book solution (1. Nd5?! Nxd5!).  For example,
>	1. Ne4 Bc6  2. Nxf6+ gxf6  3. Bxf6  and white is ahead.
>
>
>#157	The book solution hxg4 does NOT win a piece.  The refutation is,
>	1. hxg4 bxc2+  2. Bxc2 (if 2. Kc1 Rd1+!) Rxd5!  3. Qh4 Rb8
>	and black is holding his own.
>
>	Ne7+ does win a piece.  For example,  1. Ne7+ Kh8  2. hxg4 bxc2+
>	(if 2... Qxg3? 3. Rxh7+! Kxh7 4. Rh1+ with mate to follow)
>	3. Bxc2 Ba2+  4. Kxa2 Qxe7  5. Qc3  leaves white up a piece.
>
>
>#158	[Qe6+ also mates, but not as economically as Rxg7+.]
>
>
>#160	[Ne6+ also mates, but not as economically as Qxd7+.]
>
>
>#161	[Qh6 and Qh3 also mate, but not as economically as Qxd8+.]
>
>
>#171	[Bxd5 is not as good as the book solution Bh6+.]
>
>
>#180	[Nxd5 does not win a pawn.  The refutation is,  1... Nxd5
>	2. Nf5! Bxf5  3. exf5 Qb7  4. O-O Rfe8  5. Qc4 e4  6. Bxe4 Nxe4
>	7. Qxe4  and the material is equal.  Nevertheless, the book solution,
>	Nxd5, is still the best move positionally.]
>
>
>#183	[Rc5 is not as good as the book solution Bf6.]
>
>
>#193	[Qd5 (1... Qd5  2. Bd4 Qf3  3. e4 Rxd4) is not as good as the book
>	solution Qxe3.]
>
>
>#199	Rcd1 also wins.
>
>
>#204	[1. Rxe5 Qxe5  2. Ng6 hxg6!  3. Qxe5 cxd6  and it is not clear that
>	white is winning.]
>
>
>#210	Rh1 is better than the book solution Bb5.  After  1. Rh1 f6
>	(1... h6 2. Nf6+!) 2. Qxh7+ Kf7  3. Qh5+ Kg8  4. f5 Ng5  5. Bc4
>	white is clearly winning.  However, after  1. Bb5 Nxf4  2. gxf4 Qe6
>	black can still play.
>
>
>#216	Ng5 also wins a pawn.  For example,  1. Ng5 Nxe5  2. dxe5 Ne4
>	3. Nxe4 dxe4  4. Bxe4 Bxe4  5. Qxe4  with the extra pawn on c3.
>
>	a4 also wins a pawn.  For example,  1. a4 Nxe5  2. dxe5 Nh5
>	3. Bd2 g6  4. axb5 axb5  5. Bxb5  with a passed pawn on the b-file.
>
>
>#223	[1. Nxe4 Bf5!  2. Qxb4 Qd5!  3. Nf3 Nc6  4. Qxb7 Bxe4+  5. Ka1 Ne7
>	and the material is equal.]
>
>
>#224	e4 also wins.
>
>
>#229	Rxh4 also wins.  For example,  1... Rxh4  2. gxh4 g3  3. fxg3 b4
>	4. h5 c3+!  5. bxc3 bxa3  and black wins.
>
>
>#230	[Rb4 does not win.  The main line is,  1... Rb4!?  2. cxb4 a4
>	3. b5+ Kxb5  4. Ba3 c3  5. Re2! Kc4  6. f4 Kxd4  7. f5 exf5  8. e6 Kd3
>	9. e7 Bd7  10. Kf3 d4  11. Rh2 Kc4  12. Rh8 b2  13. Rb8 d3
>	14. Bxb2 cxb2  15. Rxb2 a3  16. Rb7 Be8  17. Ra7 Kb3  18. Ke3 a2
>	19. Kxd3 Kb2  20. Rb7+ Kc1  21. Ra7 =]
>
>	Ra7, Rb6, Rb5, Rd7, Rf7, Rg7, Rh7, Bd7, Kd7, Kb6, Kb5, a4, and Rc7
>	are just as good as the book solution Rb4 -- they all hold the game.
>
>
>#232	Qb5 also wins.  For example,  1. Qb5 Rc1+  2. Kf2 Rc2+  3. Kf1 Rc1+
>	4. Ke2 Rxe4+  5. Kd2  and black's game collapses.
>
>
>#235	[Qe4 is not as good as the book solutions Rxf7+ or Qxf7+.]
>
>
>#244	[Rxd5+ also mates, but not as economically as Qxc5+.]
>
>
>#246	[e5 also mates, but not as economically as Qh5+.]
>
>
>#249	d5 also wins a piece.
>
>
>#253	[c7+ also mates, but not as economically as Qe8+.]
>
>
>#258	[1. Bxg6! Qxg6!  and the win is not clear.]
>
>
>#264	Rab8 is better than the book solution Rxd4.  After  1... Rab8
>	2. Rxe7 Rxb2  3. Rf1 Rxd4  black is winning.  However, after
>	1... Rxd4  2. Qxd4 Qxb7  3. Be4 Qb8  4. Rb1 Qd8  5. Bd5
>	white may have sufficient compensation for the piece.
>
>
>#273	g3 also wins.  For example,  1... g3  2. Bf6 Qd7  and white doesn't
>	have any good moves to meet Qh6.
>
>
>#275	[After  1... Nxg2  2. Ne2!  holds blacks's advantage to two pawns.]
>
>	b5 also wins.  For example,  1... b5  2. Be2 Nc5  3. Qc2 b4
>	4. Nb1 Bg4  5. Rfe1 Nxe2  6. Qxe2 Bxf3  7. gxf3 Nxa4
>	and black is up two pawns and winning.
>
>	Nc5 also wins.  For example,  1... Nc5  2. Qc2 Nxg2  3. Ne1 Nxe1
>	4. Rfxe1 Bg4  5. Be2 Be6  6. Ra1 Qg6+  7. Kh1 Bb3  8. Qb1 Rad8
>	and black is also up two pawns and winning.
>
>
>#277	Rxg2 also wins.
>
>	[In both cases (Rg3 and Rxg2) white holds the loss to a pawn.]
>
>
>#278	[The book diagram has a typo -- there should be a black knight on c6.
>	The book solution is correct, with or without the knight on c6.]
>
>
>#279	Rc3 also wins.
>
>
>#284	[Qf2 (1. Qf2 Qxf2  2. Kxf2 Nxc1  3. Bxc1) is not as good as the book
>	solution Nf5 (1. Nf5 Qg5?  2. Qxd8+! Qxd8  3. Rc8!  with mate in not
>	more than 8 more moves).]
>
>
>#294	Bf8 also wins (1. Bf8 Rxf8  2. Nf5).
>
>	Qf4 wins most economically.  For example,  1. Qf4 f5  2. Be5+ f6
>	3. Bxf6+ Rg7  4. Bxg7+ Kg8  5. Qg5 Kf7  6. Qxd8 Kxg7  7. exf5
>	and white wins easily.
>
>
>#296	Rd4+ does NOT win.  The main line is,  1... Rd4+  2. Qxd4 Qh2
>	3. Bxe6+! Ke7  4. Qb4+ Ke8  5. Qe1 Bb5  6. Rc2 e2  7. Rc8+ Ke7
>	8. Qb4+ Kxe6  9. Qe4+  and white will draw by perpetual check.
>
>	Examining variations off the main line:
>	3... Kxe6  4. Nf4+  clearly wins for white;
>	3... Ke8 or 3... Kf8 loses to 4. Qh8+ Ke7  5. Qxh7+ and 6. Qxg6;
>	4... Kxe6  5. Nf4+ Kf7  6. Qc4+  still wins for white as the
>	    threatened mate by ...Bd7+ is covered;
>	4... Kd8  5. Qe1 Bb5  6. Rc2 Qd6  and white makes use of the
>	    king on d8 by  7. Qa5+ Ke8  8. Rc8+ Ke7  9. Qa3  winning;
>	    Similarly, if black tries 6... Qe5 or 6... e2, white plays
>	    7. Qa5+ followed by the exchange of queens on c7;
>	If on the 5th move black tries anything but ...Bb5 then 6. Nxe3
>	    or Rxe3 as appropriate wins for white;
>	6... Qe5  7. Rc8+ Ke7  8. Qb4+ Kxe6  9. Qe4 Bd7  10. Rc7
>	    wins for white;
>	6... Bd3  7. Rc8+ Ke7  8. Qb4+ Kxe6  9. Re8+ Kd7  10. Qe7+ Kc6
>	    11. Rc8+ Kd5  12. Nxe3+ Kd4  13. Rd8+ and mate next move;
>	6... Bf1  allows white to mate in 8 as above;
>	6... Qd6  7. Kh3 Qxe6+ (7... Bf1  8. Bc8 Nf4+  (8... e2
>	    9. Rxe2+ Bxe2  10. Qxe2+ Kd8  11. f4 Kxc8  12. Qe8+ Kc7
>	    13. Qe5 +/-)  9. Kg4 +/-)  8. Kh2 e2  9. Qc3 Qd6+  10. Kg1 Qd1+
>	    11. Ne1 Qd6  12. a4 +/-.
>
>	Bd7 does win.  The main line is,  1... Bd7  2. Kh3 Qh1+  3. Kg4 b5
>	4. Bb3 Ke7!  5. Nxe3 Qg1+  6. Kh3 Rf8  7. Nd5+ Ke8  8. Nf6+ Rxf6
>	9. Qb8+ Kf7  10. gxf6 Qf1+  11. Rg2 Qh1+  12. Qh2 Nf4+  13. Kg3 Qxg2+
>	14. Qxg2 Nxg2  15. Kxg2  winning for black.
>
>	[The book position is correct -- the black king is on f7.  This
>	position is from the game Muller-Stahlberg, Zurich, 1934.  After
>	32. Bc4  the game ended 32... Re8 1/2-1/2 -- Reinfeld's book
>	combination was never played.]
>
>
>#297	Bxg2 also wins.  For example,  1... Bxg2  2. Kxg2 Qg5+  3. Kf3 Rde8
>	4. Rg1 Qf4+  5. Kg2 Re2  6. Nf3 Rxc2  7. Rxc2 Qg4+  8. Kf1 Qxf3
>	with an easy win for black.
>
>------------------------------------------------------------------------------



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