Computer Chess Club Archives


Search

Terms

Messages

Subject: Re: chess and neural networks

Author: Albert Bertilsson

Date: 12:52:48 07/01/03

Go up one level in this thread


On July 01, 2003 at 15:31:55, Tom Kerrigan wrote:

>On July 01, 2003 at 14:29:25, Ricardo Gibert wrote:
>
>>On July 01, 2003 at 14:21:12, Tom Kerrigan wrote:
>>
>>>On July 01, 2003 at 13:32:19, Ralph Stoesser wrote:
>>>
>>>>Hello *,
>>>>
>>>>Why no top engine uses neural networks for positional evaluation in non-tactical
>>>>situations? Are there interesting publications about neural networks and chess
>>>>programming?
>>>>
>>>>Ralph
>>>
>>>Neural networks are for analyzing things that are
>>>"fuzzy"--voice/image/handwriting recognition, etc. Chess is a very exacting
>>>game. (It makes a big difference if your rook is on d1 vs. e1.) I doubt neural
>>>networks will ever be useful for chess.
>>>
>>>-Tom
>>
>>
>>Hmmm..but Kasparov uses the neural network within his brain to play chess
>>doesn't he? Are you contending he does not use his brain to play chess? Divine
>>inspiration?
>>
>>Perhaps you meant to say something like, "I doubt [the current interpretations
>>of] neural networks will ever be useful for chess."
>
>Kasparov has billions of neurons with 10-50 times as many interconnections. A PC
>has 50 million transistors and plays chess approximately as well. It's obvious
>to me that the human brain is not as well suited to playing chess as a computer
>(esp. considering that most human brains are much worse at chess than a 386).
>
>-Tom
Comparing neurons to transistors is not very fair, and many of these neurons are
used for things that computers don't even try (like percieving the oppenent move
by watching him makeing it) (I might be wrong, but I've never seen a computer
playing chess with a standard chess board and ordinary pieces).

Considering energy efficency the human brain do quite well I guess.

/Regards Albert



This page took 0.01 seconds to execute

Last modified: Thu, 07 Jul 11 08:48:38 -0700

Current Computer Chess Club Forums at Talkchess. This site by Sean Mintz.