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Subject: Re: knowledge and blitz; search and long games

Author: Rolf Tueschen

Date: 09:08:11 02/15/06

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On February 15, 2006 at 10:04:28, Vasik Rajlich wrote:

>We need to keep our terminology straight.

<sigh>

>
>Chess knowledge (in the context of computer chess) is what makes a program play
>well.

Or worse! - This is one of your contributions I dont like. Rybka is allegedly
good although with less chess knowledge. What makes a program play well is MORE
than what you claim. The chess knowledge must be well applicated, this is one
aspect. And then of course, you are always better if you have implemented a
specific knowledge all others dont have yet. And this is the one aspect of
Rybka's actual superiority, the other is something purely technical. Well that
is what I have understood from Chrilly, Bob and others. If you could state
something about that topic in time, before the secrets will be reveiled anyway,
you would make a valuable message to all of us.



>At standard time controls, Fruit probably has a tiny bit more chess
>knowledge than Fritz and Hiarcs.
>
>You can also talk about the complexity of a chess program. Hiarcs is probably
>the most complex of the above three, and Fruit the simplest. Shredder is another
>complex program. I suspect that the more complex programs are better at faster
>time controls.
>
>BTW - one (unfortunate) way to measure program complexity is:
>
>[program bugs or weird behaviors] * [program ELO]


You know what is unfortunate? That you now begin to talk about other interesting
programs but not your own. Not that that would be expected. Let's continue a bit
longer and everybody will understand your method of obfuscating. ;)

But anyway it's good to have you here. I like to read such messages. BTW I dont
expect answers. I'm just analysing.


>
>Vas



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