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Subject: WAC Corrections

Author: Alex Szabo

Date: 07:45:23 04/12/01


What is the accepted list of corrections to the "Win at Chess" problems?

Here's my list; can anyone suggest additional corrections (or corrections
to my corrections)?

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     Corrections and Notes to Fred Reinfeld's 300 "Win at Chess" Problems

        Compiled by Alex Szabo (alex@accesswest.com) on 12 April 2001

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                            C O R R E C T I O N S

	Problem		Solution Change		Comment
	=======		===============		=======

	#22		Bc4-a2			additional solution

	#31		d5xe6			additional solution
			g2-g3			additional solution

	#33		Qe4-f4			additional solution

	#38		Qc3-d3			additional solution

	#41		b6-b7			DELETE book solution
			Kb5-c5			DELETE book solution
			Kb5-c6			DELETE book solution
			Kb5-a5			correct solution

	#69		h2-h3			additional solution

	#92		Nf6xg4			DELETE book solution
			Be6xg4			correct solution

	#98		Nc5-b3			DELETE (2nd) book solution

	#100		Bd2-e3			additional solution

	#105		Bd6xg3			additional solution

	#120		Rh1-g1			additional solution

	#123		Re7-c7			additional solution
			Re7-e6			additional solution

	#140		Be5-c7			additional solution

	#142		f5-f6+			additional solution

	#150		Bd6-a3			additional solution
			e4-e3			additional solution

	#152		Nc3-d5			DELETE book solution
			Nc3-e4			correct solution

	#157		h3xg4			DELETE book solution
			Nd5-e7+			correct solution

	#199		Rc1-d1			additional solution

	#210		Be2-b5			DELETE book solution
			Rd1-h1			correct solution

	#216		Nf3-g5			additional solution
			a2-a4			additional solution

	#224		e5-e4			additional solution

	#229		Rh5xh4			additional solution

	#230		Rb7-a7			additional solution
			Rb7-b5			additional solution
			Rb7-b6			additional solution
			Rb7-d7			additional solution
			Rb7-f7			additional solution
			Rb7-g7			additional solution
			Rb7-h7			additional solution
			Kc6-b5			additional solution
			Kc6-b6			additional solution
			Kc6-d7			additional solution
			Bc8-d7			additional solution
			a5-a4			additional solution
			Rb7-c7			additional solution

	#232		Qa6-b5			additional solution

	#249		d4-d5			additional solution

	#264		Rd8xd4			DELETE book solution
			Ra8-b8			correct solution

	#273		g4-g3			additional solution

	#275		b7-b5			additional solution
			Nd7-c5			additional solution

	#277		Rg8xg2			additional solution

	#278		(none)			add black knight on c6

	#279		Rb3-c3			additional solution

	#294		Bd6-f8			additional solution
			Qg4-f4			additional solution

	#296		Rd8-d4			DELETE book solution
			Bc6-d7			correct solution

	#297		Bc6xg2			additional solution

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                                  N O T E S
                                =============

#22	Ba2 also wins a pawn.

	[Nxe6, Qe2, Qh5, Bb5+, and Bf1 also recover the pawn; however, the
	book solution Nxf7 (and Ba2 to a lesser extent) are positionally
	better.]


#30	[Qc3+ is not as good as the book solution Nxd6.]


#31	dxe6 also wins.  For example,  1. dxe6 fxe6  2. Ng5 Bxh2+
	3. Kxh2 Qf4+  4. Kg1 Rf8  5. Nf3  and white is a piece ahead.

	g3 also wins.  For example,  1. g3 Bd6 (1... Bxg3 is better)
	2. dxe6 Rd8  3. Ng5  and white is winning.


#33	Qf4 also wins.


#38	Qd3 also wins the queen for the rook.


#41	The book solutions b7, Kc5, and Kc6 are NOT the most economical;
	Ka5 is the most economical method.


#52	[c4 is not as good as the book solution Re7.]


#60	[Qh7+ also mates, but not as economically as Qh8+.]


#69	h3 also wins.  For example,  1. h3 Qd1+ (1... Qh4 2. Re8+ Rd8?
	3. Qe6+ Kb8 4. Qd7! and white mates)  2. Kh2 Rd6 (if 2... Rd8
	3. Re7 wins, if 2... b6 3. Qe4 wins, if 2... c6 3. Re8+ Rd8
	4. Rd7 Re7 5. Qd6 wins)  3. Qh8+ Rd8  4. Re8  and white wins.


#90	[Nxh6+ is not as good as the book solution Nxg7.]


#92	The book solution Nxg4 does NOT win a pawn.  The refutation is
	1... Nxg4?  2. Bxg7 Qh5  3. Bxg4 Bxg4  4. Qd4!

	Bxg4 does win a pawn.  For example,  1... Bxg4  2. Bxg4 Nxg4
	3. Bxg7 Qh5  and black will regain his piece a pawn ahead.


#98	Both book solutions (Nxe4 and Nb3) win; however, Nxe4 is the most
	economical.


#100	Be3 also wins.  For example,  1. Be3 Bd6 (1... Kb6? 2. Bxf5!)
	2. Ka5 Bc7+  3. b6+ Bxb6+  4. Kb5 Bc7  5. Bxc5+ Ka8  6. Be3
	and white wins;  or  1. Be3 Bb6  2. Bf2 Ka8  3. Be1 Bc7
	(3... Kb8  4. Ba5 Ka7  5. Bxb6+ Kxb6  6. Ka3 Ka7  7. Kb3 Kb6
	8. Ka4 Ka7  9. Ka5 and white wins)  4. Ba5 Bxf4  5. b6 Be3  6. Kb5
	and black is soon mated.


#104	[Qe4 and Qg4 also mate, but not as economically as Qxh5.]


#105	Bxg3 also wins, if not as cleanly.


#120	Rhg1 also wins.  For example,  1. Rhg1 Qg6  2. Nh4 Rxf6
	3. Nxg6 Rxg6  4. Qh4  and white has won the queen for two pieces.


#123	Rc7 also wins.

	Re6 wins most economically.  For example,  1... Re6  2. Qb5 g5
	3. Qd3 Re1+  4. Rxe1 Qxd3  and white's game is collapsing.


#130	[After  1... Qh6  2. Bxe3 Qxh3  3. Re2 Rh6!  black wins easily;
	however, after  2. Rxe3! fxe3  3. Qxe3 Qxe3  4. Bxe3 Rf3  5. Bg5 Rxh3
	6. Kf2  the win is not straightforward.]

	[Qh8 does not work, as should be clear from the above line.]


#136	[Qf6 and Nxg7 also mate, but not as economically as Rc8+.]


#140	Bc7 also wins.  For example,  1. Bc7 Rf7  2. h7+ Kh8  3. Qxf7 Be7
	4. Qxe7  and white is ahead a rook and a bishop with an easy win.


#142	f6+ also wins.  For example,  1. f6+ Qxf6  2. Rh7+ Kxh7  3. Qxf6
	does the job.


#146	[Bd3 and Bh3 also win, but not as economically as Bc8.]


#149	[1... Bxg2  2. Re3 Rxe3  3. Qxe3 f4!  wins decisively.]


#150	[1... Bf8  2. Bc4 Bxh6  3. Qxg6+ Qg7  4. Bxf7+ Kh8  5. Rc7 Qxg6
	6. Bxg6 Re5  7. Rh7+ Kg8  8. Rxh6 Kg7  9. Bxe4 Rxe4  and black wins.]

	Ba3 also wins.  For example,  1... Ba3  2. Rc6 Kh7  3. Qe3 Qxa2
	and black wins.

	e3 wins most economically.  For example,  1... e3  2. Bxe3 Qxe2
	3. Qxd6 Rxe3  and black wins easily.


#152	Ne4 is stronger than the book solution (1. Nd5?! Nxd5!).  For example,
	1. Ne4 Bc6  2. Nxf6+ gxf6  3. Bxf6  and white is ahead.


#157	The book solution hxg4 does NOT win a piece.  The refutation is,
	1. hxg4 bxc2+  2. Bxc2 (if 2. Kc1 Rd1+!) Rxd5!  3. Qh4 Rb8
	and black is holding his own.

	Ne7+ does win a piece.  For example,  1. Ne7+ Kh8  2. hxg4 bxc2+
	(if 2... Qxg3? 3. Rxh7+! Kxh7 4. Rh1+ with mate to follow)
	3. Bxc2 Ba2+  4. Kxa2 Qxe7  5. Qc3  leaves white up a piece.


#158	[Qe6+ also mates, but not as economically as Rxg7+.]


#160	[Ne6+ also mates, but not as economically as Qxd7+.]


#161	[Qh6 and Qh3 also mate, but not as economically as Qxd8+.]


#171	[Bxd5 is not as good as the book solution Bh6+.]


#180	[Nxd5 does not win a pawn.  The refutation is,  1... Nxd5
	2. Nf5! Bxf5  3. exf5 Qb7  4. O-O Rfe8  5. Qc4 e4  6. Bxe4 Nxe4
	7. Qxe4  and the material is equal.  Nevertheless, the book solution,
	Nxd5, is still the best move positionally.]


#183	[Rc5 is not as good as the book solution Bf6.]


#193	[Qd5 (1... Qd5  2. Bd4 Qf3  3. e4 Rxd4) is not as good as the book
	solution Qxe3.]


#199	Rcd1 also wins.


#204	[1. Rxe5 Qxe5  2. Ng6 hxg6!  3. Qxe5 cxd6  and it is not clear that
	white is winning.]


#210	Rh1 is better than the book solution Bb5.  After  1. Rh1 f6
	(1... h6 2. Nf6+!) 2. Qxh7+ Kf7  3. Qh5+ Kg8  4. f5 Ng5  5. Bc4
	white is clearly winning.  However, after  1. Bb5 Nxf4  2. gxf4 Qe6
	black can still play.


#216	Ng5 also wins a pawn.  For example,  1. Ng5 Nxe5  2. dxe5 Ne4
	3. Nxe4 dxe4  4. Bxe4 Bxe4  5. Qxe4  with the extra pawn on c3.

	a4 also wins a pawn.  For example,  1. a4 Nxe5  2. dxe5 Nh5
	3. Bd2 g6  4. axb5 axb5  5. Bxb5  with a passed pawn on the b-file.


#223	[1. Nxe4 Bf5!  2. Qxb4 Qd5!  3. Nf3 Nc6  4. Qxb7 Bxe4+  5. Ka1 Ne7
	and the material is equal.]


#224	e4 also wins.


#229	Rxh4 also wins.  For example,  1... Rxh4  2. gxh4 g3  3. fxg3 b4
	4. h5 c3+!  5. bxc3 bxa3  and black wins.


#230	[Rb4 does not win.  The main line is,  1... Rb4!?  2. cxb4 a4
	3. b5+ Kxb5  4. Ba3 c3  5. Re2! Kc4  6. f4 Kxd4  7. f5 exf5  8. e6 Kd3
	9. e7 Bd7  10. Kf3 d4  11. Rh2 Kc4  12. Rh8 b2  13. Rb8 d3
	14. Bxb2 cxb2  15. Rxb2 a3  16. Rb7 Be8  17. Ra7 Kb3  18. Ke3 a2
	19. Kxd3 Kb2  20. Rb7+ Kc1  21. Ra7 =]

	Ra7, Rb6, Rb5, Rd7, Rf7, Rg7, Rh7, Bd7, Kd7, Kb6, Kb5, a4, and Rc7
	are just as good as the book solution Rb4 -- they all hold the game.


#232	Qb5 also wins.  For example,  1. Qb5 Rc1+  2. Kf2 Rc2+  3. Kf1 Rc1+
	4. Ke2 Rxe4+  5. Kd2  and black's game collapses.


#235	[Qe4 is not as good as the book solutions Rxf7+ or Qxf7+.]


#244	[Rxd5+ also mates, but not as economically as Qxc5+.]


#246	[e5 also mates, but not as economically as Qh5+.]


#249	d5 also wins a piece.


#253	[c7+ also mates, but not as economically as Qe8+.]


#258	[1. Bxg6! Qxg6!  and the win is not clear.]


#264	Rab8 is better than the book solution Rxd4.  After  1... Rab8
	2. Rxe7 Rxb2  3. Rf1 Rxd4  black is winning.  However, after
	1... Rxd4  2. Qxd4 Qxb7  3. Be4 Qb8  4. Rb1 Qd8  5. Bd5
	white may have sufficient compensation for the piece.


#273	g3 also wins.  For example,  1... g3  2. Bf6 Qd7  and white doesn't
	have any good moves to meet Qh6.


#275	[After  1... Nxg2  2. Ne2!  holds blacks's advantage to two pawns.]

	b5 also wins.  For example,  1... b5  2. Be2 Nc5  3. Qc2 b4
	4. Nb1 Bg4  5. Rfe1 Nxe2  6. Qxe2 Bxf3  7. gxf3 Nxa4
	and black is up two pawns and winning.

	Nc5 also wins.  For example,  1... Nc5  2. Qc2 Nxg2  3. Ne1 Nxe1
	4. Rfxe1 Bg4  5. Be2 Be6  6. Ra1 Qg6+  7. Kh1 Bb3  8. Qb1 Rad8
	and black is also up two pawns and winning.


#277	Rxg2 also wins.

	[In both cases (Rg3 and Rxg2) white holds the loss to a pawn.]


#278	[The book diagram has a typo -- there should be a black knight on c6.
	The book solution is correct, with or without the knight on c6.]


#279	Rc3 also wins.


#284	[Qf2 (1. Qf2 Qxf2  2. Kxf2 Nxc1  3. Bxc1) is not as good as the book
	solution Nf5 (1. Nf5 Qg5?  2. Qxd8+! Qxd8  3. Rc8!  with mate in not
	more than 8 more moves).]


#294	Bf8 also wins (1. Bf8 Rxf8  2. Nf5).

	Qf4 wins most economically.  For example,  1. Qf4 f5  2. Be5+ f6
	3. Bxf6+ Rg7  4. Bxg7+ Kg8  5. Qg5 Kf7  6. Qxd8 Kxg7  7. exf5
	and white wins easily.


#296	Rd4+ does NOT win.  The main line is,  1... Rd4+  2. Qxd4 Qh2
	3. Bxe6+! Ke7  4. Qb4+ Ke8  5. Qe1 Bb5  6. Rc2 e2  7. Rc8+ Ke7
	8. Qb4+ Kxe6  9. Qe4+  and white will draw by perpetual check.

	Examining variations off the main line:
	3... Kxe6  4. Nf4+  clearly wins for white;
	3... Ke8 or 3... Kf8 loses to 4. Qh8+ Ke7  5. Qxh7+ and 6. Qxg6;
	4... Kxe6  5. Nf4+ Kf7  6. Qc4+  still wins for white as the
	    threatened mate by ...Bd7+ is covered;
	4... Kd8  5. Qe1 Bb5  6. Rc2 Qd6  and white makes use of the
	    king on d8 by  7. Qa5+ Ke8  8. Rc8+ Ke7  9. Qa3  winning;
	    Similarly, if black tries 6... Qe5 or 6... e2, white plays
	    7. Qa5+ followed by the exchange of queens on c7;
	If on the 5th move black tries anything but ...Bb5 then 6. Nxe3
	    or Rxe3 as appropriate wins for white;
	6... Qe5  7. Rc8+ Ke7  8. Qb4+ Kxe6  9. Qe4 Bd7  10. Rc7
	    wins for white;
	6... Bd3  7. Rc8+ Ke7  8. Qb4+ Kxe6  9. Re8+ Kd7  10. Qe7+ Kc6
	    11. Rc8+ Kd5  12. Nxe3+ Kd4  13. Rd8+ and mate next move;
	6... Bf1  allows white to mate in 8 as above;
	6... Qd6  7. Kh3 Qxe6+ (7... Bf1  8. Bc8 Nf4+  (8... e2
	    9. Rxe2+ Bxe2  10. Qxe2+ Kd8  11. f4 Kxc8  12. Qe8+ Kc7
	    13. Qe5 +/-)  9. Kg4 +/-)  8. Kh2 e2  9. Qc3 Qd6+  10. Kg1 Qd1+
	    11. Ne1 Qd6  12. a4 +/-.

	Bd7 does win.  The main line is,  1... Bd7  2. Kh3 Qh1+  3. Kg4 b5
	4. Bb3 Ke7!  5. Nxe3 Qg1+  6. Kh3 Rf8  7. Nd5+ Ke8  8. Nf6+ Rxf6
	9. Qb8+ Kf7  10. gxf6 Qf1+  11. Rg2 Qh1+  12. Qh2 Nf4+  13. Kg3 Qxg2+
	14. Qxg2 Nxg2  15. Kxg2  winning for black.

	[The book position is correct -- the black king is on f7.  This
	position is from the game Muller-Stahlberg, Zurich, 1934.  After
	32. Bc4  the game ended 32... Re8 1/2-1/2 -- Reinfeld's book
	combination was never played.]


#297	Bxg2 also wins.  For example,  1... Bxg2  2. Kxg2 Qg5+  3. Kf3 Rde8
	4. Rg1 Qf4+  5. Kg2 Re2  6. Nf3 Rxc2  7. Rxc2 Qg4+  8. Kf1 Qxf3
	with an easy win for black.

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